What Tech Must Learn from Trump and Brexit: Stop Disrupting, Start Engaging

What Tech Must Learn from Trump and Brexit: Stop Disrupting, Start Engaging

Technological advances have been credited with accelerating the pace of globalization. Unfortunately, globalization – including multi-national initiatives such as the EU single market – has unwittingly caused casualties among middle and working class people around the world due to widespread outsourcing, offshoring, and the easing of border security in the case of the EU. The crisis of middle east migrants into Europe has not made things easier, and the repeated domestic and international terrorist attacks of the past several months have made things worse. These factors help to explain the Trump phenomenon in the U.S., the recent Brexit vote in Europe, and the surge of far-right movements in France, Austria, the Netherlands and other EU countries against immigration, international trade agreements, and dramatic income inequality. Coming full circle, tech companies cannot afford any longer to ignore their role in addressing these issues if they are to avoid being scapegoated sooner or later by enraged citizens manipulated by cynical political leaders.

Google 2, Oracle 1: The Fast-Growing API Economy Survives a Major Scare

Google 2, Oracle 1: The Fast-Growing API Economy Survives a Major Scare

In 2010 Oracle sued Google over patent infringement regarding the use of 37 Java APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) when it developed the Android OS for smartphones. The latest of three lawsuits – following the original 2010 case and the 2012 appeal – just ended in favor of Google. Software developers, enterprise customers, users, and industry participants can all breathe a sigh of relief. Assuming this verdict sticks it will reinforce current business practices around APIs, and in the process help the API-fueled growth of startups and others developing APIs for new business and consumer applications to continue.

The Public Cloud: Is There Still Room for Google?

The Public Cloud: Is There Still Room for Google?

In recent months Google has demonstrated its determination to compete with AWS and Azure for leadership in the public cloud infrastructure space for the enterprise. It took them a while to get serious about this, but in late 2015 they brought in Diane Greene, founder of VMware and an acknowledged heavyweight in enterprise computing, and since then have lured some prestige customers from AWS and other cloud service providers. Is there still time for Google to pull it off, or are they too late to put Microsoft and Amazon on the defensive? Guest columnist Hakan Jakobsson presents some strong arguments against Google’s chances of success.

All Dollars Are Not Equal: The Crucial Difference between Good, Neutral & Bad Revenue

All Dollars Are Not Equal: The Crucial Difference between Good, Neutral & Bad Revenue

Again and again in working with tech companies I am reminded that common sense ain’t so common, particularly regarding the range of sales opportunities that management and sales teams pursue or respond to, and the frenetic way they sometimes go about trying to close business. But there’s a simple test for all entrepreneurs and executives to use in service to their customers and their own top and bottom lines.

The Chicken & The Pig – The Critical but Elusive Art of Making Strategic Alliances Work

The Chicken & The Pig – The Critical but Elusive Art of Making Strategic Alliances Work

Unfortunately most strategic alliances fall short of their goals, often failing completely. Yet this type of arrangement can be critical to the success of young startups, fast-growing ‘tweeners, as well as established giants. How can smaller companies – the Pigs in our metaphor – avoid the treacherous pitfalls and dramatically increase their chances of success when they engage in critical growth initiatives with larger organizations?

All Shook Up – How AWS is Pulling Off the Impossible in Enterprise IT

All Shook Up – How AWS is Pulling Off the Impossible in Enterprise IT

Since Amazon’s Q3 earnings announcement, AWS (Amazon Web Services), has been grabbing more headlines than ever. The nine-year old unit is breaking records as the dominant cloud infrastructure services provider, rapidly becoming a default choice for enterprise and government organizations. How have they pulled this off, and can anyone give AWS a run for its money?